Our History: The little church by the side of the road


By Pat Stephens - Wayne Township - Huber Heights - Historical Society



Stephens

Stephens


File photo

This parsonage served Sulphur Grove Church of the United Brethren beginning in 1935.


WTHHS Photo

Editor’s Note: This is another installment of a series of columns by Historian Pat Stephens called Our History.

HUBER HEIGHTS — Relocating the parsonage of Sulphur Grove Church of the United Brethren was mentioned in 1928. The parsonage basement flooded every time it rained, and something needed to be done. According to a story told by William Fry in the “History of Sulphur Grove Church”, across the road from the parsonage was a store that sold beer, and “displeasure of alcoholic beverages could be shown other than the annual temperance sermon”. For that reason, the parsonage needed to be moved closer to the church. This was a time when things were booming, and people were saving money. But, that soon would change.

On Oct. 29, 1929, the day that many know as Black Tuesday, everything including the stock market, banks, employment and home income and finally the churches were affected. This was the beginning of what many of us know as the “Depression”. People were unemployed and for our little farm community, there was little or no money for clothing or food. This lasted for almost 6 years.

During Rev. Jacoby’s service to Sulphur Grove he served not only as the pastor, but also as a community leader and servant. He was the umpire for baseball, time keeper for basketball and gave an invocation every Monday morning as the school assembly.

January 1934, a committee was appointed to investigate the possibility of building a new parsonage. Henry and Eliza Booher, donated two lots by the church for the new parsonage and labor was donated. The new home for the pastor and family was dedicated on June 9, 1935. At a cost of $4,142.00 for materials, which was paid in full by September 1945. For the Jacoby family the new parsonage was a blessing. During a recent conversation between myself and Melba Jacoby Moore and Junior Jacoby, telling stories about the early days in Wayne Township, Melba said they didn’t know how to act in the new house. “We had indoor plumbing and didn’t have to use an out-house, we had electricity, running water and all the modern conveniences! It was wonderful”!

This series on “The Little Church at the Side of the Road” will be continued.

Stephens
https://www.hhcourier.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/35/2018/02/web1_PatStephens.jpgStephens File photo

This parsonage served Sulphur Grove Church of the United Brethren beginning in 1935.
https://www.hhcourier.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/35/2018/02/web1_parsonage2.jpegThis parsonage served Sulphur Grove Church of the United Brethren beginning in 1935. WTHHS Photo

By Pat Stephens

Wayne Township

Huber Heights

Historical Society

Pat Stephens is a Historian at the Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society. For more information about the Historical Society see our website www.huberhistory.org Facebook/Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society, email: wthhhs@huberhistory.org, or, call Sue Patrick, President 937-545-4902 or Pat Stephens 937-974-5286.

Pat Stephens is a Historian at the Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society. For more information about the Historical Society see our website www.huberhistory.org Facebook/Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society, email: wthhhs@huberhistory.org, or, call Sue Patrick, President 937-545-4902 or Pat Stephens 937-974-5286.

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