Our History: The story behind school houses


By Pat Stephens - Wayne Township - Huber Heights - Historical Society



Stephens


File photo

Editor’s Note: This is another installment of a series of columns by Historian Pat Stephens called Our History.

HUBER HEIGHTS — Many times, when we talk about our schools and the changes, we mention the “School Houses”, those who attended them, get excited about talking about them. Here’s the story behind the “little brick school house.”

When Charles Huber began building, even though it seemed like a small development with originally, 200 homes, to a community of less than 1500 residents, with all the children attending Wayne School on Taylorsville Rd., it was a major shock to the school. Mr. Huber quickly stepped up and offered “Huber Homes” for classrooms. He leased 14 new houses to the school system for $1 a year to serve as classrooms, it was determined that as many as 30 more would be needed as the development grew.

Each house, which served a single class of 39 pupils, was standard construction, except that partitions had been omitted, fluorescent ceiling lights installed, and tile flooring was substituted with wall-to-wall carpeting. The garage was used as a cloakroom and storage place for school supplies.

In Oct. 1957, Robert Heidkamp, Principal, for Wayne Township Elementary Schools, announced that two additional Huber Home classrooms were put into use. At that time, the fourth and sixth grades moved into their new classroom homes at 4626 and 4723 Pocono Drove. Previously, both classes were held in the school gym.

Also in 1957, Huber Homes use as classrooms received national attention in the October issue of Good Housekeeping Magazine, with a story in its “Better Way” section. The magazine stated “Almost inevitably, new home developments produce school crises. But in Wayne Township, Ohio where the H. C. Huber Construction Company is in the midst of putting up 2,000 houses, the firm is helping to whip the classroom shortage threatened by its own project.”

Dr. Harold T. Wright, Wayne Township Superintendent, stated in the article, the donation of the homes was “an unprecedented and extremely generous gesture.” without it, the alternative would have been to hold half-day sessions in the beginning and triple session later in the school year.” Dr. Wright reported a gain of 408 students in the schools, over the previous year and in 1957 there were 1023 students and 46 teachers.

During the 1957 school year, the Township Booster Club was formed to help support the school’s athletic and recreational programs.

The Historical Society is always looking for documents, photos, books, stories and memorabilia about the township and City of Huber Heights. If you would like to share we can copy, scan and photograph your items.

For more information go to our website at www.huberhistory.org.

Stephens
http://www.hhcourier.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/35/2017/06/web1_PatStephens.jpgStephens File photo

By Pat Stephens

Wayne Township

Huber Heights

Historical Society

Pat Stephens is a Historian at the Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society. For more information about the Historical Society see our website www.huberhistory.org Facebook/Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society, email: wthhhs@huberhistory.org, or, call Sue Patrick, President 937-545-4902 or Pat Stephens 937-974-5286.

Pat Stephens is a Historian at the Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society. For more information about the Historical Society see our website www.huberhistory.org Facebook/Wayne Township Huber Heights Historical Society, email: wthhhs@huberhistory.org, or, call Sue Patrick, President 937-545-4902 or Pat Stephens 937-974-5286.